Find the course overview for each period and track below, or download an overview of the entire programme (pdf).

You can access your personal schedules in MyTimetable.

Period 1: Joint programme

Period 2: track specific content

Track coordinator: Dr Amy Nivette (A.E.Nivette@uu.nl).

In the Criminology and Safety track, you develop your understanding of issues surrounding crime and criminal justice policy responses. You will acquire knowledge about the causes of crime in different environments, the impact on public safety and the effectiveness of policy solutions.

Attention will be paid to both old and ‘new’ forms of crime that have emerged from new technologies and means of communication. You will examine the patterns and explanations of crimes that occur within the local neighbourhood environment, crimes that occur in the virtual world, and crimes that occur across borders.

Courses

First track course

The first course in this track is offered by sociology: Criminology and safety (theories, trends, and policies).

You will read theoretical literature on different crime problems and gain insight into the most important and current empirical findings. Using an existing data base, you will investigate trends and patterns of crime in the Netherlands and abroad, and where crimes and victimization are concentrated.

By the end of the course, you will ‘specialize’ in one type of crime of your choice by examining in depth the temporal trends and geographical patterns, reviewing theoretical explanations and empirical evidence, and developing potential policy solutions.

Second (elective) track course

We recommend the following course as your track elective:

Neighbourhoods and crime (GEO4-3316, Social Geography)
This course examines crime from a social geographic perspective, focusing on the spatial aspects of crime in a metropolitan context. In particular, this course addresses the question of how specific physical and social composition of city neighbourhoods relate to crime.

Questions addressed in this course include: How does residential segregation differ between countries? How can residential segregation be explained and how successful are policies aimed at combating segregation? What is the role of the built environment in the (perceived) safety of the neighbourhood? What role can urban design play in reducing criminality?

Third track course

As a third sociological course within this track you may choose between Internet, Social Media and Networks and Essentials of care: analysing current policy trends.

Track coordinator: Dr Tali Spiegel (T.Spiegel@uu.nl).

In this track, you will develop an understanding of current changes in healthcare systems in the Western world.

The last decades have been marked by a strong increase in a demand for healthcare due to demographic changes (such as reduced fertility and increased life expectancy), which have had a great influence on healthcare costs. Western governments have been trying to respond to these changes by introducing various policy measures such as the privatization of healthcare and decentralization.

In this course, we will take a look at the policy transitions and their implications for various stakeholders.

Courses

First track course

The main sociology track course, Essentials of care: analysing current policy trends, lays emphasis on the unintended consequences of policy interventions in the field of healthcare. We will take a look at these policy shifts and their impact on social inequality and cohesion in Western societies and in the Netherlands in particular.

Questions addressed will include:
 

  • What determines who has access to informal healthcare?
  • How can healthcare arrangements be organised efficiently?
  • Has the withdrawal of government agencies led to an increase in inequality between men and women or between old and young?

Second (elective) track course

We recommend one of the following courses as your track elective:

Nudging (Social, Health and Organisational Psychology)
This course will focus on the use of nudging as a novel strategy to adapt behaviour, with a particular focus on the area of health and well-being. 

We address the theoretical background of nudges in comparison to other approaches for behaviour modification, and incorporate empirical work providing insight into working mechanisms and (boundary conditions for) the effectiveness of nudges.

In addition, taking a more practical approach, students will be challenged to think about the design of a nudge, the implementation issues that may come along with it, and the requirements for a proper evaluation of its effectiveness.

Finally, the course will address the topical academic and societal debate about nudging and the role of various institutions in promoting health and well-being, including ethical considerations.

Loss & psychotrauma (Clinical Psychology)
In the Master's course Loss and Psychotrauma, the consequences of major life events are considered in terms of their manifestations and course, risk and protective factors, and theoretical explanations.

Their societal and clinical relevance are explored. The broad spectrum of normal and complicated reactions is addressed, covering roles lay persons, counsellors and therapists can play in helping victims cope with such events. Based on evaluation of intervention efficacy studies, the possibilities and limitations of intervention will be critically appraised.

During the course, diagnostic systems (e.g. DSM-5) and assessment instruments for posttraumatic stress disorders and complicated grief will be discussed. Several evidence-based interventions (e.g. CBT, EMDR) will be introduced and discussed too.

Organization Development (Social, Health and Organisational Psychology)
In this course students learn to diagnose, substantiate and carry out targeted interventions in teams from the perspective of organisational development and change management. In light of the significant changes taking place in the healthcare sector, knowledge of these changes and related skills are especially valuable in this field.

Third track course

As a third sociological course within this track you may choose between Internet, Social Media and Networks and Criminology and Safety: Theories, trends, and policies.

Track coordinator: Dr Rense Corten (R.Corten@uu.nl).

This track provides insight into theories and research relating to the Internet, social media and networks. Many of these themes can be analysed meaningfully from the perspective of social network analysis.

The track aims at delivering professionals who can provide a much-needed interface between (Big-) data analysts on the one hand and policy makers and other stakeholders on the other hand.

Ideally you will be able to translate social problems and policy issues related to online processes into relevant research questions that can be studied with digital data, and conversely, you will be able to interpret and apply results from data analysis to relevant social contexts, and to provide policy recommendations based on this research.

Courses

First track course

The first course, Internet, Social Media and Networks, is offered by Sociology and again named after the track. It considers the increasing influence that the internet and social media are having on social processes.

In this course, you learn how to apply theories and methods from social network analysis to questions about the internet and social media, in the context of contemporary social problems. Methods of data collection in online social contexts, use of specialized software, and ethical issues will also be discussed.

Second (elective) track course

We recommend one of the following courses as your second track course: 

Nudging (Social, Health and Organisational Psychology)

This course will focus on the use of nudging as a novel strategy to adapt behaviour, with a particular focus on the area of health and well-being. 

We address the theoretical background of nudges in comparison to other approaches for behaviour modification, and incorporate empirical work providing insight into working mechanisms and (boundary conditions for) the effectiveness of nudges.

In addition, taking a more practical approach, students will be challenged to think about the design of a nudge, the implementation issues that may come along with it, and the requirements for a proper evaluation of its effectiveness.

Finally, the course will address the topical academic and societal debate about nudging and the role of various institutions in promoting health and well-being, including ethical considerations.

Social influence, public communication and advertising (Social, Health and Organisational Psychology)
Social influence is everywhere around us. Not only in advertising, but also in politics, in the supermarket, at work, and at home. Everywhere, people try to persuade each other to buy something, say yes to something, or change their minds about something. How does social influence work, and which strategies are most effective? These questions are central in this course.

The goal of this course is to learn the basic theories and processes of social influence, and to learn to apply them to real-life problems. Because people are exposed to more social influence attempts than they can consciously process, we will also look at unconscious forms of influence.

Third track course

As a third sociological course within this track you may choose between Essentials of care: analysing current policy trends and Criminology and Safety: Theories, trends, and policies).